Category Archives: Fall of man, series of posts

The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science

The subject line for this entry is the title of a book by Peter Harrison (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007).  In this book and in two earlier books, The Bible, Protestantism, and the Rise of Natural Science (1998) and ‘Religion’ … Continue reading

Posted in Debus, Allen G., Dostoevsky, Fyodor, Fall of man, Fall of man, series of posts, Helmont, Jan Baptista van, Pagel, Walter, Russian literature, Russian religious philosophy, Science, History of, Shestov, Lev, Webster, John | 1 Comment

Dostoevsky, on the Fall: a literary interpretation

Robin Feuer Miller is Edytha Macy Gross Professor of Humanities at Brandeis University and teaches Russian and European literature of the nineteenth century.  She is a second-generation scholar of Russian literature who specializes in Dostoevsky (her mother, Kathryn B. Feuer, … Continue reading

Posted in Dostoevsky, Fyodor, Fall of man, Fall of man, series of posts, Miller, Robin Feuer, Russian literature, Russian religious philosophy, Shestov, Lev, Writing (uncategorized) | Leave a comment

Dostoevsky, on the Fall: the story ends; Shestov’s interpretation of it

The point in the text where we left off in the last entry isn’t the end of Dostoevsky’s story.  In the morning, the ridiculous man awakes from his “dream” a changed man.  The sight of the revolver he had wanted … Continue reading

Posted in Dostoevsky, Fyodor, Fall of man, Fall of man, series of posts, Russian literature, Russian religious philosophy, Shestov, Lev, Solovyov, Vladimir | Leave a comment

Dostoevsky, on the Fall: “I . . . corrupted them all!”

[From Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” The Eternal Husband and Other Stories (New York: Bantam Books, 1997), translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, continuing on p. 295, with section V . . .] V Yes, yes, … Continue reading

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Dostoevsky, on the Fall: “The people of that happy earth”

[From Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” The Eternal Husband and Other Stories (New York: Bantam Books, 1997), translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, starting on p. 289, near the end of section III . . .] … Continue reading

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Dostoevsky, on the Fall

A titan of world literature, Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) needs no introduction.  Compared to every other Russian I’ve discussed here, he is a household name.  Nikolai Berdyaev once gushed: So great is the worth of Dostoevsky that to have produced him … Continue reading

Posted in Dostoevsky, Fyodor, Fall of man, Fall of man, series of posts, Russian literature, Russian religious philosophy, Shestov, Lev, Tolstoy, Leo | Leave a comment

Maximus the Confessor, on the trees of Paradise

If his interpretation of the trees of Paradise was central for Shestov, to the point that it informed practically all of his writing, curiously, the same was not the case for the Church Fathers.  So says Lars Thunberg in his … Continue reading

Posted in Fall of man, Fall of man, series of posts, Maximus the Confessor, Russian religious philosophy, Shestov, Lev | 1 Comment